Home arrow Tripoli Geography
Tripoli Geography | Print |  E-mail

Tripoli lies at the western extremity of Libya close to the Tunisian border, on the continent of Africa. Over a thousand kilometeres separate Tripoli from Libya's second largest city, Benghazi. Coastal oases alternate with sandy areas and lagoons along the shores of Tripolitania for more than 300 kilometers.

The "Sha'biyah" includes the City, its suburbs and their immediate surroundings (City and "Sha'biyah" are almost coextensive). In older administrative systems and throughout history, there existed a Province ("muhafazah"), State ("wilayah") or City-state with a much larger area (though not constant boundaries), which is sometimes mistakenly referred to as Tripoli but more appropriately should be called Tripolitania.

As a sha'biyah, Tripoli borders the following sha'biyat:

Tajura Wa Al Nawahi AlArba' - east
Tarhuna Wa Msalata - southeast
Al Jfara - south
Az Zawiyah - west
The dominant climatic influences in Tripoli, a coastal lowland city, are Mediterranean. The city enjoys warm summers and mild winters with an average July temperature of between 22 °C (72 °F) and 29 °C (84 °F). In December temperatures have reached as low as 1 °C (34 °F), but the average remains at between 9 °C (48 °F) and 18 °C (64 °F). The average annual rainfall is less than 400 millimetres (15.7 in), but can be very erratic.[3]


Al Saaha Alkhadhraa (The Green Square), located in the city centre is mostly landscaped with palm trees as is much of Tripoli.For example, epic floods in 1945 left Tripoli under water for several days, but two years later an unprecedentedly severe drought caused the loss of thousands of head of cattle. Deficiency in rainfall is no doubt reflected in an absence of permanent rivers or streams in Tripoli as well as an absence throughout the entire country. The allocation of limited water is considered of sufficient importance to warrant the existence of the Secretariat of Dams and Water Resources, and damaging a source of water can be penalized by a heavy fine or imprisonment.

The Great Manmade River, a network of pipelines that transport water from the desert to the coastal cities, supplies Tripoli with its water.[4] The grand scheme was initiated by Gaddafi in 1982 and has had a positive impact on the city's inhabitants.

Tripoli is dotted with public spaces, but few fit under the category of large city parks. The Green Square located near the waterfront is scattered with palm trees, the most abundant plant used for landscaping in the city. Tripoli zoo, located south of the city centre, is a large reserve of plants, trees and open green spaces and is the country's biggest zoo.

 

About Tripoli

Tripoli  is the largest and capital city of Libya.

Tripoli has a population of 1.69 million. The city is located in the northwest of the country on the edge of the desert, on a point of rocky land projecting into the Mediterranean Sea and forming a bay. Tripoli was founded in the 7th century BC by the Phoenicians, who named it Oea

Tripoli International Airport

Tripoli International Airport (IATA: TIP, ICAO: HLLT) serves Tripoli, Libya. It is operated by the Civil Aviation and Meteorology Bureau of Libya and is the nation's largest airport. Located in the town of Ben Ghashir 34km south of the city centre, Tripoli International is a hub for Libyan Airlines. The airport is also a hub for Afriqiyah Airways and Buraq Air.

Most flights leave Tripoli International Airport from the main International Passenger Terminal, while domestic flights leave through the National Terminal. The terminal capacity is 3 million passengers a year and the airport is currently handling around 1.5 million passengers a year.

Transport to and from Tripoli city center usually involves taking a taxi or shared taxi. Tour operators offer coaches to and from the airport connecting it with numerous hotels in the city centre.
 

[+]
  • Narrow screen resolution
  • Wide screen resolution
  • Increase font size
  • Decrease font size
  • Default font size